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GitHub Blog 5 Feb, 17:44
Welcome to the January 2019 edition of Release Radar, where we share new and exciting releases from world-changing technologies to weekend side projects. Most importantly, they’re all projects shipped by you.From smart charts to clever chat bots, here are some exciting projects that have kicked off 2019 with a new release.gotop 2.0gotop is a terminal-based graphical activity monitor providing the ability to monitor your processes’ CPU and memory use, among other things. The newest version adds battery monitoring, documentation updates, and bug fixes.gotop 2.0 screenshotLearn more about goTop 2.0Anime 3.0Anime is a library that helps you animate CSS, SVG, DOM attributes, and JavaScript objects. The latest 3.0 release introduces new easing functions, more hooks for animation states, a project website, bug fixes, and more.Learn more about Anime 3.0Did you know? Anime is a Japanese term meaning animation.Syncthing 1.0Syncthing helps you synchronize files and directories between computers and mobile devices. Syncthing is celebrating version 1.0 “Graduation Day,” and its maintainers wrote about what it means to get to 1.0. “Much like a black belt in martial arts, it doesn’t indicate that you’ve learned all there is to know, a 1.0 version doesn’t mean Syncthing is done. There is a lot left to do and learn.”Learn more about Syncthing 1.0Dejavu 3.0Dejavu a tool that helps you import and explore data with Elasticsearch. Its maintainers describe it as a “missing web UI for Elasticsearch”. The latest 3.0 version is a significant rewrite of Dejavu that improves overall performance, introduces new ways to filter and inspect data, and adds the option to connect to multiple indexes.Learn more about Dejavu 3.0Did you know? You can try out Dejavu using public data sets of Hacker News posts and popular movies.VSCodeVim 1.0VSCodeVim combines things you already know and love from Vim in Visual Studio Code, like modal editing. Similarly to Syncthing, VSCodeVim is celebrating its 1.0 release, marking three years of development. The latest version includes bug fixes and refactors debugging configuration.Learn more about VSCodeVim 1.0Amplitude.js 4.0AmplitudeJS is an HTML5 audio player that helps you create custom controls. Check out their gallery of examples to see what you can do with it—the possibilities are limitless. Version 4.0 helps you create visualizations using Web Audio APIs, hook into audio events, and more.
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GitHub Blog 20 Jan, 20:44
Welcome to the December 2018 edition of Release Radar, where we share new and exciting releases from world-changing technologies to weekend side projects. Most importantly, they’re all projects shipped by you.The GitHub community has been incredibly busy with exciting new releases over the holiday period. Here are a few highlights from December that caught our attention.fx 10.0fx is a handy command-line tool that helps you explore and manipulate JSON data. It’s an unassuming tool with lots of power—see some examples of it in action. Version 10.0 introduces search with regular expressions, documentation updates, and bug fixes.fx screenshot of terminal commands and featuresLearn more from the release notesVault 1.0Vault helps you securely save and access your infrastructure and application secrets, like database passwords and API keys. After four years of development, Vault has joined the esteemed 1.0 club! The 1.0 release boasts many improvements, such as using cloud services to “unseal” a Vault, OpenAPI specifications for the tool’s API, and an updated user interface.Learn more from their announcementPyTorch 1.0We’re also welcoming another member to the 1.0 club this month: PyTorch. A library for deep learning, PyTorch has reached their 1.0 milestone release—including tons of changes. For example, this release features a just-in-time (JIT) compiler that can optimize models into a form that doesn’t require the Python interpreter. PyTorch 1.0 also introduced an experimental C++ interface, and a new package to support distributed multiprocess computation.Learn more from the release notesNES.css 1.0It’s dangerous to code alone—take this! NES.css is a CSS framework that helps you make sites with a classic 8-bit console aesthetic. NES.css’s initial release goes straight to 1.0, unveiling a range of components, including web staples like buttons, form inputs, and progress bars, plus a collection of pixelated icons (Octocat never looked more at home in low res).Screenshot showing the NES-style(8bit-like) CSS FrameworkLearn more from the release notesVitess 3.0Vitess is a system for making database clusters with MySQL. Vitess 3.0 introduces several changes, such as improved developer usability with new docs, simplified database parameters, support for monitoring with Prometheus, and a few updates to improve performance.Learn more from their announcementSpaceVim 1.0SpaceVim is a distribution of the text editor Vim that bundles plugins, configuration, color schemes, and more, to create a more IDE-like experience for Vim. SpaceVim reached 1.0 in December, with their latest version shipping a new default font, support for working with GraphQL and Scheme files, and much more.SpaceVim 1.0 screenshotLearn more from the
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GitHub Blog 18 Jan, 02:22
We are excited to release GitHub Desktop 1.6, bringing new features and improvements around onboarding, suggested next steps, and large file restrictions.With the release of GitHub Desktop 1.6, we’re addressing the question we constantly ask ourselves after we finish a task: “What’s next?”. This is the first iteration intended to keep you in your groove so that you can share your code with your team as quickly as possible. We’ve provided guidance for onboarding and suggestions for what actions to take depending on where you are in your workflow.Get started fasterFor past versions, once you’ve downloaded Desktop and completed the setup, you were left without additional guidance. Because the next steps weren’t clear, our users weren’t sure how to get started. With the new onboarding workflow, you’ll find steps to help you add your first repository and get started building software more quickly.Guidance to help you get started fasterSuggested next steps to keep you moving forwardOften, we’ve seen users struggle with how they should use the app when there are no changes. What state is my repository in? What should I do next? Should I publish my branch or pull new changes from GitHub? How do I view my files?In 1.6, when there are no changes, GitHub Desktop will offer a few different options for useful next steps based on your last action in the application. If you’ve just committed, it’s likely you’ll want to push your branch to GitHub. Or maybe you’re just picking up a project, and you want to pull down the latest changes to view them in your editor. Depending on where you are in the process, this new feature will help you keep your momentum and continue shipping.Suggested next steps in actionSupport around large file restrictionsWe’re also excited to highlight a feature that addresses a pain point for many users around large file restrictions. Our support team has been fielding questions about how to address GitHub’s restriction on files greater than 100MB. Starting today, if you try to commit a large file into your repository in Desktop, we’ll alert you and provide the option to back out of your commit or get set up on Git LFS.This feature wouldn’t have been possible without one of our open source community members, @Daniel-McCarthy. He recognized the level of impact this would have, worked with our team to determine the best way to solve the problem, and then submitted a pull request. Thanks for making GitHub Desktop awesome @Daniel-McCarthy! We love our open source contributors
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GitHub Blog 18 Jan, 02:22
In the latest GitHub for Atom release, we’re introducing two new features that will improve your commit experience.Rendering diffs in the editorPreviously, DOM elements were rendered for every line of each diff, which meant a lot of work for React and the DOM to process. This led to rendered diffs being limited to less than 32k bytes, resulting in the inability to load large or multiple diffs.Now diffs are rendered using Atom’s TextBuffer. The text buffer’s most important benefits are improved performance when loading large diffs and the ability to render multiple diffs. A few other perks include keyboard bindings to use Atom shortcuts with the ability to navigate around diffs, as well as copy and pasting code from a diff.diff-in-textbufferRendering diffs with TextBuffer makes it easier to review and edit code from within a diff view whether you’re making changes now or in the future. TextBuffer provides options, such as:Editable diffs: the ability to change text within the diff viewCode folding: collapsing and expanding blocks of codeSyntax highlighting: highlighting different “parts of speech” of code using different colorsMulti-cursor edits: the ability to change text within the diff view in multiple places at onceCommit previewNow you can use the option to “See All Staged Changes” before you commit, opening diffs of all staged changes in one pane. Seeing all changes at once makes it easier to double-check your work and write a meaningful commit message about your changes. Commit preview uses the new and improved diff rendering to render multi-file diffs.While building out this feature, user research sessions gave us informed data to make (and finalize) changes to the design, color, and text of the button. This feedback helped us feel confident that the updates created a more intuitive workflow and led to a more polished diff view with a cleaner look.commit-preview-gifWhat’s next for GitHub for AtomUser experience is important. Our goal is to make it easy to write, review, and collaborate on code within Atom. We have plenty of updates in store, but look out for upcoming improvements to pull request reviews.If you have feedback about what we’ve worked on—or ideas for what you’d like to see in the pull request workflow—reach out to us in the Atom repository. We’re always looking for participants for our ongoing usability studies.Sign up to help us improve GitHub for AtomThe post View multi-file diffs with commit preview appeared first on The GitHub Blog.

https://github.blog/2019-01-10-view-multi-file-diffs/
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GitHub Blog 17 Jan, 19:52
We are excited to release GitHub Desktop 1.6, bringing new features and improvements around onboarding, suggested next steps, and large file restrictions.With the release of GitHub Desktop 1.6, we’re addressing the question we constantly ask ourselves after we finish a task: “What’s next?”. This is the first iteration intended to keep you in your groove so that you can share your code with your team as quickly as possible. We’ve provided guidance for onboarding and suggestions for what actions to take depending on where you are in your workflow.Get started fasterFor past versions, once you’ve downloaded Desktop and completed the setup, you were left without additional guidance. Because the next steps weren’t clear, our users weren’t sure how to get started. With the new onboarding workflow, you’ll find steps to help you add your first repository and get started building software more quickly.Guidance to help you get started fasterSuggested next steps to keep you moving forwardOften, we’ve seen users struggle with how they should use the app when there are no changes. What state is my repository in? What should I do next? Should I publish my branch or pull new changes from GitHub? How do I view my files?In 1.6, when there are no changes, GitHub Desktop will offer a few different options for useful next steps based on your last action in the application. If you’ve just committed, it’s likely you’ll want to push your branch to GitHub. Or maybe you’re just picking up a project, and you want to pull down the latest changes to view them in your editor. Depending on where you are in the process, this new feature will help you keep your momentum and continue shipping.Suggested next steps in actionSupport around large file restrictionsWe’re also excited to highlight a feature that addresses a pain point for many users around large file restrictions. Our support team has been fielding questions about how to address GitHub’s restriction on files greater than 100MB. Starting today, if you try to commit a large file into your repository in Desktop, we’ll alert you and provide the option to back out of your commit or get set up on Git LFS.This feature wouldn’t have been possible without one of our open source community members, @Daniel-McCarthy. He recognized the level of impact this would have, worked with our team to determine the best way to solve the problem, and then submitted a pull request. Thanks for making GitHub Desktop awesome @Daniel-McCarthy! We love our open source contributors
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GitHub Blog 17 Jan, 02:22
Logged in lately? You may notice some changes to your GitHub dashboard. We’ve updated dashboards to surface personalized repository suggestions, featuring a third column, new styling, and a full-width layout. GitHub is slowly moving to more full-width layouts and using one on the dashboard gave us the opportunity to highlight more projects for you to discover.As part of this release, the “Discover repositories” page has found a new home under Explore. Repository suggestions appear on Explore and in the new dashboard sidebar.Have feedback on the new dashboard? Let us know.

https://blog.github.com/2019-01-16-dashboard-ui-refresh/
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GitHub Blog 10 Jan, 20:14
In the latest GitHub for Atom release, we’re introducing two new features that will improve your commit experience.Rendering diffs in the editorPreviously, DOM elements were rendered for every line of each diff, which meant a lot of work for React and the DOM to process. This led to rendered diffs being limited to less than 32k bytes, resulting in the inability to load large or multiple diffs.Now diffs are rendered using Atom’s TextBuffer. The text buffer’s most important benefits are improved performance when loading large diffs and the ability to render multiple diffs. A few other perks include keyboard bindings to use Atom shortcuts with the ability to navigate around diffs, as well as copy and pasting code from a diff.diff-in-textbufferRendering diffs with TextBuffer makes it easier to review and edit code from within a diff view whether you’re making changes now or in the future. TextBuffer provides options, such as:Editable diffs: the ability to change text within the diff viewCode folding: collapsing and expanding blocks of codeSyntax highlighting: highlighting different “parts of speech” of code using different colorsMulti-cursor edits: the ability to change text within the diff view in multiple places at onceCommit previewNow you can use the option to “See All Staged Changes” before you commit, opening diffs of all staged changes in one pane. Seeing all changes at once makes it easier to double-check your work and write a meaningful commit message about your changes. Commit preview uses the new and improved diff rendering to render multi-file diffs.While building out this feature, user research sessions gave us informed data to make (and finalize) changes to the design, color, and text of the button. This feedback helped us feel confident that the updates created a more intuitive workflow and led to a more polished diff view with a cleaner look.commit-preview-gifWhat’s next for GitHub for AtomUser experience is important. Our goal is to make it easy to write, review, and collaborate on code within Atom. We have plenty of updates in store, but look out for upcoming improvements to pull request reviews.If you have feedback about what we’ve worked on—or ideas for what you’d like to see in the pull request workflow—reach out to us in the Atom repository. We’re always looking for participants for our ongoing usability studies.Sign up to help us improve GitHub for Atom

https://blog.github.com/2019-01-10-view-multi-file-diffs/
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GitHub Blog 9 Jan, 00:15
While you’re heads down contributing to your favorite repositories, GitHub is busy finding projects and people that share your interests. That way, when you decide to come up for air, you can easily glance at what the world’s largest software community has to offer.GitHub already collects repositories for you based on projects you contribute to, star, and visit. To go deeper, we began attaching a simple “Star” button today to every GitHub Topic. This offers you the option to plainly indicate which topics matter most to you so that we can fetch the code and developers that share your interests.With this release, you’ll see your starred topics displayed on GitHub Explore, along with a group of fresh repositories related to them. The topics you star will also be displayed alongside your starred repositories in your profile’s “Stars” tab.Starred topics displayed on the GitHub Explore pageYou can star a topic nearly anywhere you encounter one, including search results, individual topic pages, and GitHub’s Explore, Topics, and Stars pages.Starring topics is a straightforward way for you to tell us what you want to see, so we can help keep you organized and connected to the stuff you care about. Now we can start displaying more types of content within each topic, like related developers and events. And as you begin to tell us about which topics you’re interested in, we can start looking for patterns in the Octoverse that’ll help us surface even more cool ideas for you.Topics have been a community-driven GitHub feature since they were released two years ago. Developers have created more than 400,000 topics to build subject-based relationships between repositories. And the GitHub community started curating the descriptions, related links, and images for topics last fall.Starting today, topics are related to you—not just your repositories. Needless to say, we’re thrilled to see what kind of GitHub gold we can help you discover.

https://blog.github.com/2019-01-08-topic-starring/
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GitHub Blog 7 Jan, 22:15
GitHub announces unlimited private reposToday we’re announcing two major updates to make GitHub more accessible to developers: unlimited free private repositories, and a simpler, unified Enterprise offering. We’re excited about these updates to our Free and Enterprise offerings:GitHub Free now includes unlimited private repositories. For the first time, developers can use GitHub for their private projects with up to three collaborators per repository for free. Many developers want to use private repos to apply for a job, work on a side project, or try something out in private before releasing it publicly. Starting today, those scenarios, and many more, are possible on GitHub at no cost. Public repositories are still free (of course—no changes there) and include unlimited collaborators.GitHub Enterprise is the new unified product for Enterprise Cloud (formerly GitHub Business Cloud) and Enterprise Server (formerly GitHub Enterprise). Organizations that want the flexibility to use GitHub in a cloud or self-hosted configuration can now access both at one per-seat price. And with GitHub Connect, these products can be securely linked, providing a hybrid option so developers can work seamlessly across both environments.Learn moreGitHub Pro (formerly GitHub Developer) and GitHub Team are also available for developers and teams who need professional coding and collaboration features. And of course, open source contributors will still have everything they need to collaborate on public repositories, including our free version of GitHub Team.Whether you’re a student about to write your first line of code, an enterprise leader with teams around the world, or an open source maintainer, we want GitHub to be the best place for you to code, collaborate, and connect with the global community of developers. Today’s changes are a big investment in the future of GitHub, and we’re excited to see to what you build in 2019.

https://blog.github.com/2019-01-07-new-year-new-github/
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GitHub Blog 7 Jan, 20:15
The GitHub Pull Requests extension in VS Code allows you to manage your pull requests directly from your IDE. Over the past months the team has added even more enhancements to pull request functionality. Using the latest version, you can now create pull requests, leave suggested edits as a comment, and view status checks for each pull request.Create Pull RequestsTo create pull requests in VS Code, hover over the GitHub Pull Requests title and click the + sign. Choose the target branch for the pull request, press enter, and relax—you’ve opened your pull request.create pull request vscode 2Suggested editsProvide suggested code edits and leave them as comments with a diff that shows the current code alongside your suggested changes. The suggestions can easily be applied by selecting Apply Patch to commit the new patch of code.apply patchYou also have the option to stage all suggested changes when changes have not yet been staged.stage changesDisplay status checksOnce you create a pull request, status checks will appear in the description. You can now view the progress of each check that was integrated: passing, failing, and in-progress.status checks in prGive the latest extension a tryVisit the VS Code Pull Requests Repository to view release notes and download the latest release package. Don’t forget, you can always install or update the latest version directly from inside of VS Code.

https://blog.github.com/2019-01-07-create-pull-requests-in-vscode/
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GitHub Blog 23 Dec 2018, 01:02
Game Off just wrapped up with over 300 games submitted making it our largest event yet! This year’s theme–HYBRID–proved to be both fun and challenging.Here are the winners as voted on by the game developers themselves. You can also view all of the entries’ ratings on itch.io.Overall Winner: SingularitySingularity puts you in control of a robot exploring the planet, where economy and industry have collapsed and humans are facing extinction. The code deep within your neural network urges you forward, but your robotic parts are easily damaged. Destroy and hybridize parts of other robots to repair yourself. The creators Kendall Breivogel, Sean Collins, Alexander Runnels, and Alexandre Thorp want you to try to become the ultimate AI—do you accept this challenge?► Play (Windows, Linux) · View source (Unreal Engine, C++)Best Gameplay - MIX UPMIX UP is a colorful and polished match three puzzle game from @guoboism. If you liked the challenge of 2048, you’ll love this!► Play (Web, Windows, macOS) · View source (Unity, C#)Best Graphics - Fire of KalaDefend your base against the enemy horde in Fire of Kala—a beautiful, unique hybrid platform and tower defense game.► Play (Web) · View source (Unity, C#)Best Audio - HomeHome is a delightful game from @sharpfives, where you have to help your hybrid hero find a way off of an abandoned planet. What adventures await your hero? There’s only one way to find out!► Play (Web) · View source (Phaser, JavaScript)Innovation - LensPoint, click, and drag your way to victory in Lens—a unique Window manager meets physics puzzle game from @notexplosive. You’re sure to have a nostalgic time playing this one.► Play (Windows) · View source (Lua)Theme Interpretation - Blow the Shark DownHybridizing both game characters and genres, Blow the Shark Down is a remarkable turn-based combat game featuring hilariously animated Sharkmen. This gang of beasts will entertain parties of up to four!Note: At least two controllers required 🎮 🎮Controls: ↑ ↓ ← → - move · A - hook · B - cross punch · Y - headbutt · X - uppercut · RB - block · BACK - taunt► Play (Windows) · View source (Unity, C#)Staff picksWhile we can’t list all 330 games, here are a few that kept us entertained.Editor’s note: Lee actually did try to list all 330 games with screenshots and videos in this blog post!D-TacD-tac is a prototype for a Doom, turn-based tactics game that allows you to load Doom-compatible .wad files. Think Doom meets X-COM in your browser (while using a .wad from Freedoom).► Play (Web) · View…
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GitHub Blog 21 Dec 2018, 22:22
Welcome to the latest edition of Release Radar, where we share the projects popping up on our radar—from world-changing technologies to weekend side projects from this past November. Most importantly, they’re all projects shipped by you.eDEX-UI i 1.0Do you ever wish that using your computer was a little less Office Space and a little more Tron? Then eDEX-UI 1.0 was made for you, providing a terminal loaded with movie-inspired graphs, maps, and a touch-screen keyboard.eDEX-UI i 1.0 exampleLearn more from the release notesHTTPie 1.0HTTPie is a command-line tool that helps you interact with web servers. It’s like a super-powered curl with colorized output, JSON formatting, and persistent sessions. With its latest release, HTTPie has joined the 1.0 club! This version adds an automatic default color scheme, future-proofing for TLS 1.3, and so much more.HTTPie 1.0 exampleLearn more from the release notesDid you know? The Hypertext Transfer Protocol reached 1.0 in 1996.HTTP Prompt 1.0HTTP Prompt, an interactive HTTP client, (and companion to HTTP Pie) is also celebrating a 1.0 release. HTTP Prompt helps you explore and debug APIs with autocompletion, OpenAPI specification integration, and automatic cookie handling. With version 1.0, HTTP Prompt adds support for the HTTP CONNECT method, a command to clear the screen, and some bug fixes.HTTP Prompt 1.0 exampleLearn more from the release notesSVGR 4.0SVGR is a tool that helps you turn SVGs into React components. The SVGR 4.0 release promises to be “lighter, better, faster, stronger,” all while sporting a new engine and bug fixes.Take an example SVG and run it through SVGR:$ npx @svgr/cli --icon --replace-attr-values "#063855=currentColor" icon.svgimport React from 'react'const SvgComponent = props => ( )export default SvgComponentLearn more from the release notessvgedit 4.0SVG-edit is a browser-based SVG drawing tool created with JavaScript to help unleash the inner artist in all of us. And it just reached the 4.0 milestone. In this release, SVG-edit has migrated several APIs from using callbacks to Promises.Learn more from the release notesDid you know? SVG-edit has a nifty live demo so you can get drawing right away.buku 4.0Buku is a private, local tool to help you store and manage your bookmarks from the command line. 4.0 must’ve been an auspicious number in November, because Buku 4.0 features new keyboard commands searching and opening bookmarks, enhanced clipboard support (for tools like Screen and tmux), and bug fixes.buku 4.0 exampleLearn more from the release notesDid you know?…
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GitHub Blog 20 Dec 2018, 20:07
A few of our favorite 2018 shipsSometimes the smallest ships have the biggest impact. With 2018 coming to a close, we’re providing a round-up of what we shipped and what you may have missed, both big and small. We didn’t include every launch of the year (that would make for a very long read), but we did recap this year’s most loved ships.CollaborationThe developer community is at the heart of GitHub. It’s where new developers get started, where experienced developers expand their knowledge, and where all developers work together. As the number of software developers worldwide continues to increase, the opportunities for collaboration increase as well. We strive to build experiences that make it as easy and intuitive as possible for all developers to do their best work. Here are some ships that make collaboration on GitHub even better:Suggested changes: Quickly make and incorporate suggestions, like fixing typos or changing code, during the pull request review process.Watch releases: Limit repository notifications exclusively to releases. Receive notifications when new releases are published in a repository without receiving notifications about other updates and conversations.Move issues from one repo to another: Repository admins can move issues across repositories and place them where they belong.Related issues: When you create a new issue, you’ll see a list of all related issues in your repository, so you can avoid opening a duplicate issue.Commit co-authors: See who has contributed to every commit, regardless of how many contributors there are. Every author gets attribution in the pull request and in their contribution graph.Hovercards: Hover over a contributor’s avatar to get an overview of their profile, what teams they belong to in your organization, if they are a code owner, if they’re making their very first pull request, and more.New tools for open source maintainers: We released a few new tools in 2018 to make the lives of open source maintainers a little easier.Saved replies keyboard shortcuts: It’s now even easier to save replies with keyboard shortcuts.Label improvements: Now you can add emojis when words just aren’t enough, add descriptions for more context, search through your labels, and preview how your label will look while editing.Profile activity overview: The new activity feed allows you to easily show off contributions you make. In addition to filtering your contributions by calendar year, you can now filter by organization and see where you contributed over your time on GitHub.Save a notification for later: Bookmark any notification to move it into a prioritized list.Issue and pull request templates: Issue templates better support automation and standardization. Automate assignees,…
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GitHub Blog 19 Dec 2018, 22:02
It’s been over six months since we introduced GitHub for Unity 1.0, and we’ve been busy. Since launch, we’ve continued to improve the extension and fix bugs, focusing on maintenance and providing an overall smoother experience.GitHub Enterprise supportThe GitHub for Unity team received multiple requests to support GitHub Enterprise. Most recently, a team wanted to use the Unity plugin for their gaming engine but needed Enterprise support. GitHub Engineer @stanleygoldman addressed the request and shortly after, we were able to release a beta for customers to use and share feedback on.In this release, GitHub for Unity version 1.2.0 officially supports GitHub Enterprise. Now, even more developers will be able to use the GitHub for Unity extension.GitHub for Unity displayedWhat’s next for GitHub for UnityWe’re a small team. We’re still trying to figure out what our impact should be and what work we should focus on. In 2019, we’re excited to see what’s in store for GitHub for Unity—and we’d love to hear your thoughts.If you have questions, feedback, or want to get involved in building the GitHub for Unity extension, reach out to us in the project repository or on Twitter. Or see what we’ve been up to—try GitHub for Unity.

https://blog.github.com/2018-12-19-github-unity-support-for-enterprise/
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GitHub Blog 19 Dec 2018, 21:17
Your trust is our first priority. That’s why we’re making it easy to get all of the data connected to your profile, whenever you need it. Now you can better understand what information we store, so you can make informed choices about how you use GitHub.screenshot of requeseting an archive of your GitHub dataHow it worksFollow these steps to request an archive of your data:Visit your account settings page.Click “Start export” in the “Export account data” section. You will receive an email when the export is ready.Click the link in the email to download the archive.The archive will contain your profile data, plan, and any email addresses connected with your account in addition to the issues, pull requests, comments, reviews, releases, projects, events, attachments, milestones, and settings for each of your repositories—along with basic information about the users who have interacted with them.Since the information is exported in a machine-readable format (Git and JSON), the archive allows you to back up your data offline, or move it to another service altogether. After all, it’s your data.Archives remain available for seven days or until you choose to delete them. If you want more control over what information is exported, or if you want to export an organization’s information, use the Migration API.Learn more about archiving your data

https://blog.github.com/2018-12-19-download-your-data/
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GitHub Blog 13 Dec 2018, 23:24
Top open source projects of 2018This article is part of a series based on our 2018 State of the Octoverse report—trends and insights into GitHub activity, the open source community, and more from the GitHub Data Science Team.In 2018 alone, we saw more new users than in our first six years combined, and we celebrated hosting over 100 million repositories. All of this growth is thanks to the open source community. Together, you’ve built and collaborated on a broad spectrum of projects, from hobbies to professional tools and across varying developer experience levels. As the year comes to a close, we wanted our final Octoverse report of 2018 to highlight some of your most active new open source projects of the year.To look back at your projects, we pulled data for the period December 10, 2017 to December 9, 2018. We pulled the top projects made open source in 2018 by looking at the number of stars the project received in the first 28 days being public, and by the number of unique contributors to the project in the first 28 days being public.Top projects of 2018The top projects open sourced in 2018 run the gamut from learning to code to tools for professionals, from side projects for fun to projects for getting work done.For those new to code, or new to a coding language, you starred projects with coding examples, like trekhleb/javascript-algorithms and leonardomso/33-js-concepts, along with quick tutorials like 30-seconds/30-seconds-of-code.You also contributed to projects for Hacktoberfest, adding Hello World programs in a variety of languages to Hacktoberfest-2018/Hello-world and Omkar-Ajnadkar/Hello-World, or even more complex algorithm examples to VAR-solutions/Algorithms.You also had a lot of fun, starring and contributing to gaming projects like wangshub/wechat_jump_game, and had some laughs with projects like kelseyhightower/nocode. felixrieseberg/windows95 and Microsoft/MS-DOS sparked some nostalgia, quickly attracting your stars and contributions.New open source projects also helped you get work done with tools like denoland/deno for developing in TypeScript, ValveSoftware/Proton for porting games to Linux, and facebookresearch/Detectron to support research in image recognition algorithms.Based on starsWe pulled the top 10 projects open sourced in 2018 based on the total number of stars they accumulated in their first 28 days on GitHub.Top contributors based on starsBased on contributorsWe pulled the top 10 projects open sourced in the 365 days prior to December 10, 2018 based on the total number of contributors to the project in their first 28 days on GitHub.Top projects based on contributorsTop topics for new open source projectsThese are the non-language topics that had the biggest increase in number of open source projects created in 2018 compared to 2017. Third on the list, dotnet shows that more open source projects are developing apps for Windows. In our programming…
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GitHub Blog 11 Dec 2018, 21:09
Developers and teams expect business-critical services to be reliable. From our perspective, reliability can be defined by three questions: is the product available, how well does the product recover from failure, and how performant is the product as it evolves over time. In order for millions of developers to develop, build, and deploy their software, the underlying platform that powers GitHub must be resilient to a wide range of failure modes. We understand that our products need to satisfy the levels of trust our community expects of us when putting their code and their livelihoods on our platform. Today, we are pleased to announce the new GitHub Status Page.Behind the ScenesGitHub is built on a platform of distributed services, spread over multiple data centers across the globe. An incident can occur on any of one these platform tiers, affecting either a standalone service or a cluster of interrelated components. With that in mind, we needed a way to accurately communicate this level of granularity to our users and designed a new status page to provide this functionality.Our new status site now lists the individual component statuses that make up our wider product. Now GitHub can communicate the statuses of components that matter most to our users, and users can subscribe to them. Git operations, for example, are now split out from API requests, and Pages builds can be tracked independently of Notifications. This makes our messaging during an incident more accurate and reliable.A component list of all of the services that make up GitHub.In addition to splitting out the component products on the status site, we’ve also focused on improving and organizing the information we provide to users during an incident. Our goal has been to change our workflow to improve our customer communication during an incident and to reduce friction for incident commanders.To do this, we started by decoupling the idea of a component status update (e.g. Pages is experiencing degraded performance) from the lifecycle of an incident. The degraded performance of a component could be representative of a wider incident, but updating its status does not allow us to track and share mitigation steps and descriptive updates. In other words, status updates are snapshots in time of a specific component, and incidents are trackable communications between GitHub and customers.Integrating the new status into your operationsOne of the benefits of the new status site is the ability to subscribe to our status changes in multiple ways, such as email, SMS, or webhook delivery. These subscriptions can follow the entire lifecycle of an incident from investigation to remediation. For example, if you’re using Jenkins to run a Continuous Delivery pipeline and our Git operations experience a service slowdown, you could create a webhook to have your Jenkins system apply a backoff mechanism to prevent downstream errors.A popover of all of the subscription options for consuming status state changes.Deprecating the old status siteOver the next three months, we’ll continue to support our old status site, as well as its API. So you’ll have time to move any integrations over to the new site. Throughout February leading up to the deprecation, we will perform brownouts in an effort to help you identify systems that may be pointing at the deprecated site. At the end of February, we’ll be adding a redirect for web traffic to the new status page and fully shutting down the old API.Testing out the new siteIn addition to deprecating the old site, we will test the new one on our live systems. On December 18, 2018, we’ll be running a test of our new incident response workflow at 10:00 PST (18:00 UTC). Throughout this…
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GitHub Blog 10 Dec 2018, 22:29
GitHub Learning Lab is now available for Enterprise customersWhether you have 100 developers or 100,000, onboarding new team members and sharing knowledge across the organization can be a challenge. At this year’s Universe, we announced GitHub Learning Lab for organizations to help solve this problem at a broader scale for our cloud customers.We want to make it easier for developers to build their skills, without ever leaving GitHub. And now, with Learning Lab, teams of developers can onboard, train, and share knowledge across their organization, customized to their specific workflows. Since its launch, we’re happy to report that tens of thousands of developers have completed free, hands-on projects to build skills at their own pace.We’ve been working with you to understand how we can help your teams onboard, train, and innovate faster. Many of you stated that you’d love to bring Learning Lab to your teams, but you need the learning to happen behind your firewall. As of today, Learning Lab for organizations is now available for our GitHub Enterprise customers, too.We’re excited to see what Learning Lab can do to transform the way your developers learn and share knowledge at scale.Get your team started on GitHub Learning lab

https://blog.github.com/2018-12-10-learning-lab-your-new-corporate-trainer/
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GitHub Blog 10 Dec 2018, 20:29
All of us share a lot of links on GitHub. In fact, nearly one-third of comments on issues and pull requests include a link. Hidden behind each of those links is important context that can inform the conversation. But each link that navigates you away from the conversation represents a context switch that reduces your focus and the timesaving benefits of productivity tools.With the Content Attachments API (now in beta) and the growing ecosystem of GitHub apps, content behind each URL can be embedded directly in the conversation you’re having on GitHub. Apps using the Content Attachments API help developers and their teams stay focused on what matters most: shipping beautiful code—all within GitHub.New apps using the Content Attachments APIWe’re excited to introduce you to four new GitHub apps that use the Content Attachments API to help you communicate visually, file bugs, plan your projects, and document your system.RunKitRunkit solves the “it works on my computer” problem by making it easy for you to file reproducible and runnable bug reports for Node.js projects. Runkit notebooks package a full environment within a container and can be shared with a URL to give project maintainers access. With Runkit and Content Attachments API, a Runkit link in an issue or pull request now shows the contents of the entire notebook and its output.RunKit in actionInstall RunKit NotebookLeanBoardSometimes your team just needs to stand in front of a whiteboard to work through the details of an idea. LeanBoard brings this collaborative experience to remote teams across a shared board of sticky notes. Now, with Leanboard and Content Attachments API, you can just drop a link in an issue or pull request to preserve the conversation. Even better, screenshots in content attachments are updated automatically (every five minutes) as the board changes.LeanBoard in actionInstall LeanBoardCloudAppSometimes visual communication is the most efficient way to quickly and clearly communicate an idea or concept. CloudApp brings the human connection back to digital workflows through video messaging, screen recording, screenshot annotation, and GIF creation. With CloudApp and the Content Attachments API, you can paste a URL to render a GIF or screenshot in your issue and ensure that your teams have clear visual context to resolve issues faster.CloudApp in actionInstall CloudAppLucidchartUse Lucidchart individually, or as part of a team to create and share architecture diagrams, mockups, user flows, and other visuals. These help communicate an idea visually, and clarify how applications and systems should function. With Lucidchart and the Content Attachments API, you can now add these visuals to a GitHub issue and, unlike static diagrams, they update as your system evolves.Lucidchart in actionInstall LucidchartShowcase your content on GitHubThe Content Attachments API brings the work behind your code to the forefront on GitHub. We can’t wait to see how you use it to bring more context to your conversations about software development.Check out the partner apps and tell us what you think. Ready to make your own app? Head over to the developer blog to start building your own app using the Content Attachments API.

https://blog.github.com/2018-12-10-introducing-content-attachments-api/
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GitHub Blog 8 Dec 2018, 01:43
Emoji on GitHub This article is part of a series based on our 2018 State of the Octoverse report—trends and insights into GitHub activity, the open source community, and more from the GitHub Data Science Team.On GitHub, developers can express themselves in their preferred medium: words, code, or tiny cartoon images if they choose. To get a sense of how our community expresses themselves with emoji, we looked at which ones they use in (and in reaction to) issue and pull request comments. Our data on emoji reactions covers public and open source repositories between October 1, 2017 and September 30, 2018.To learn more about our numbers and methodologies, check out this year’s Octoverse report.ReactionsIn 2016, we released emoji reactions to quiet the noise of contentless issue and pull request comments like +1. How are you using reactions today?Total reactions by emojiChart of total reactions by emojiExpressions of approval and celebration make up the most of your reactions. In fact, you’re giving the 👍 and celebrating with a 🎉 more than you use any other reaction.Percent of reactions by emoji type and programming languageEmoji usage by programming language Looking at projects tagged with a primary programming language, we can see which emoji language communities use most. Comments in Ruby projects had the most :hearts:, and C# users are casting nearly double the :thumbsdown:s as any other group.Geographic trends in reactions by continentEmoji usage by continentBeyond programming communities, geographic trends demonstrate how far some emoji reach. No matter their location, developers react to build consensus and to say, “job well done”. For all of our differences, :thumbsup: is the most widely used reaction across continents. Similarly, more negative emoji like :thinking: and :-1: are used less often, suggesting that sometimes, harder conversations require more words.Zooming in, Japan spread positivity by reacting with more :thumbsup:s and :heart:s per user than any other country. And developers in the Czech Republic have something to celebrate. They reacted with the most :tada:s on average.Reaction-provoking projectsYou’ve reacted to public comments on topics from managing code to managing depression, expressing laughter, thanks, and support. In the last year, you:Congratulated the creator of Vuetify on career and project milestonesExtended almost 2,000 :thumbsup:s to the React team’s plan to modernize React DOMShared a :tada: in issues opened just to say “amazing job” to CSS paintings (and found abstract art in IE7)Gave thanks for time saved by a new libraryAnd shared feedback in Refined GitHub on Project Paper Cuts (thank you!)Emoji in commentsFive emoji could never fully represent the complexity of human emotion. When a :thumbsup: isn’t enthusiastic enough, you often post a :rocket:. In the last 12 months, the GitHub community created almost 10,000+ issue comments containing no other content but this tiny craft. That’s a lot of warp-speed shipping.Emoji used in open source issue comments is often tactical, supporting code reviews and to-dos like looking over code (:eyes:), OK-ing changes…
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